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About 2 hours ago from Rachel Silver's Twitter via Twitter Web Client

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Emil Amos has made over fifty records across a wide terrain of underground music with a catalogue that stretches over twenty years. He is the drummer of Om, Grails and Lilacs & Champagne and the singer and guitarist of Holy Sons – Emil is a true multi-instrumentalist.  Filmmusik, out 2nd June on Pelagic Records, is the first album Amos has released under his own name, bringing all his signature styles under one record.

 

“This is the entire cache of instrumental tracks I’ve built up since we originally formed Lilacs & Champagne five years ago,”  Amos explains. “”Midnight Feature” and “Know Yr Arrested” were the first two songs I made for L&C.  Grails has barely ever had any unreleased B-sides available, but making Chalice Hymnal was such a long process that I had three more songs that couldn’t fit onto that record.  They were recorded when I’d just moved to NYC and there was a massive ice storm that winter. I slid my car into a curb and stayed with engineer Al Carlson for a few days at Mexican Summer’s studio in Greenpoint, Brooklyn (where “Morbid Funeral” and “Chase Scene” were recorded). “Dead Cop Drama” was a holdover from our Portland era, recorded with our favorite engineer from Burning off Impurities all the way to Deep Politics, Jeff Stuart Saltzman. The idea of releasing a Filmmusik LP was stolen from the keyboardist of Can, Irwin Schmidt, who had a virtually unknown series of records under the same name.  It’s a pretentious concept for sure, until you eventually have a body of music lying around that actually stands up strong in that mold. And this is basically years of work that fell under the same umbrella of a specifically insidious mood… one that mirrors a kind of inner, paranoid, sonic solipsism.”

The vastly different sounds of Amos’s four bands are blended into one kaleidoscopic union that plays like a soundtrack to a lonely 70s European suspense film.

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